Do you remember the Low Fat Fad Diet?

Do you remember?

Do you remember back in the day when fat was “bad for you”?  Do you remember all the headlines about how Ancel Keys did this great study that proved that fat – particularly satuated fat – caused heart disease? Are you aware that your doctor probably still believes this?  Do you still believe this?

Well, guess what?  Ancel Keys was not only wrong, he falsified his data!  Yep, he kept the data that confirmed the lipid hypothesis he had already decided on, and threw away everything that didn’t fit!

What Tom Naughton has to say about this…

Now, I’m not just imagining this, as you will soon see.  However, it would be folly for you to believe me, because who am I?  Really, nobody, when it comes to authority on diet and exercise.  Many recognized authorities have now come to the conclusion, under their own power, that the lipid hypothesis – and its attendant low fat diet a la Ornish – is way, way wrong. I came to the same conclusion, based on my unwelcome diagnosis of diabetes back in 1997.  I struggled with the low fat diet for two years before, in frustration, I decided to try low carb.   You know, just because I was desperate.  What a life change that was, and I never looked back!

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Now, I’m not going to try to stuff hoity-toity research and science down your throats.  I don’t want to run everybody off!  BUT, if you would enjoy having some great fun while you learn, I urge you to visit my friend Tom Naughton’s website.  Tom bills himself as an “Edutainer,” and he certainly lives up to the name.  On Tom’s site, you can order a copy of his DVD, Fat Head, or really, if you insist, it’s free on Hulu.  (Either way, I don’t earn a nickel, but buying the DVD would be a nice to way to support Tom’s educational and entertainment efforts, and besides, he’s a nice,  nice guy.)  Fat Head is a laugh-out-loud funny response to Morgan Spurlock’s Super Size Me.  Trust me, it’s WAY better, and the message is excellent.

Has this become a recipe blog? 

So, now I am sure you are wondering whether I’m trying to turn this blog into a recipe or diet blog.  Nope, not.  However, I kind of have to write about what’s on my mind (please leave a comment if you have a particular interest), and right now, it’s almost time for dinner!

This is an excellent main-dish that can also be a complete meal!  It combines the mild flavors of chicken and cream with the sharper taste of spinach and parmesan for a very filling dinner.  Note that you can easily substitute fish for the chicken and have an even more nutritious dinner, particularly if you are watching calories.  By the way, don’t be derailed by the long list of ingredients.  Most of them are spices, and you probably have them all in your cabinets already.
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alfredo 300x189 Do you remember the Low Fat Fad Diet?

Low Carb Chicken Alfredo

Low Carb Chicken Alfredo

  • 8 Frozen Chicken Breasts, fresh or frozen
  • Salt, Pepper to taste
  • 2 T. Butter
  • 2 T. Olive Oil
  • 16 oz package frozen spinach, thawed & drained
  • 3 oz. Cream Cheese
  • 1 C. Heavy Cream
  • ½ C. Water
  • 1 ½ tsp. Onion powder
  • 1 ½ tsp. Garlic Powder
  • 1 ½ tsp. Chicken base or chicken bouillon, dissolved in
  • ¼ C. water
  • ¼ C. Parmesan Cheese, grated or shredded

Heat oven to 350°.  Melt butter with olive oil in 2″ deep skillet.  Salt and pepper the chicken breasts, cook in skillet in the oil and butter mixture until lightly browned and most of inside is cooked.  Place in 9″ X 13″ baking pan.

Add the cream cheese to the skillet, slowly, adding cream as the cream cheese starts to melt.  Once the cream and cream cheese are well combined, add the water, stirring well.

Once the water is incorporated, add the remaining ingredients and pour over the chicken.

Bake in preheated oven for 30 minutes.  Remove from oven, top with parmesan cheese and return to oven for an additional 5 minutes for some nice browning.

Serves 8.  Per Serving:  Calories: 511, Protein 48 gr., Carb 4 gr., Fiber 1 gr., Fat 33.4 gr.

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3 Responses to Do you remember the Low Fat Fad Diet?

  1. If those are the recipes you’re going to share, then make it a recipe blog! Low carb has helped me more than anything else I’ve tried. (I’m not sure why I couldn’t comment using my website – I’d rather not use my Facebook profile!)

  2. pknord says:

    You probably have already discovered Dreamfield’s lower-carb pasta. We went out to dinner at our local Italian restaurant last evening with my brother, sister-in-law, Mom, and my cousin from MI, and I took along enough of it for my meal. The cook there is happy to cook it for me.

    Low carb is definitely the best for me–I’ve fallen off the wagon for the last year or so, and must get back on.

    • Georgene says:

      Hi, and thanks for commenting! My blog is just starting out and I am very grateful for your visit!

      Unfortunately, Dreamfield’s (while I hope it does for you what you want it to do) isn’t all that is advertised. There’s been a great deal of discussion about this topic on Jimmy Moore’s blog, and Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt actually started the controversy with his comments on the Fourth Annual Low Carb Cruise (which I attended). Andreas and Jimmy both showed in tests on themselves that the blood glucose profile for Dreamfield’s is in some ways worse, and certainly is no better, than regular pasta. And that’s for someone without diabetes! I can only imagine it would be worse for someone with diabetes! I would suggest testing every thirty minutes for about 7 hours to get the full picture of what Dreamfields actually does to the glucose levels! And be sure to cook exactly as directed. Cooking even slightly longer causes the glucose results to be even worse!

      More here: and here . It’s always a good idea to test for yourself, so you don’t do harm unintentionally.

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