10 Interesting and Unique Activities to Pursue After Retirement

Without children to look after and job to attend to, retirement can definitely be the best time of a baby boomer’s life.  The hardworking days during your younger adult life has already passed and you are now free to spend as much time as you like on what makes you happy.

As much as you want to enjoy the beginning of your retirement just sitting at home and doing nothing, it’s important to get out there, be active and keep things exciting.  Sure, rest is important but don’t stay idle for long as this can do more harm to your health than good.

Retirement offers lots of opportunities to try something new and if you haven’t figured out what to do yet, here some interesting activities that you might want to try out. 

1. The “Bucket List” Travel

They say that you should travel while you’re young but I don’t think there’s an age limit when it comes to traveling; while you’re still fit to travel and capable to spend for it, go on vacations as often as you can.

One of the top travel trends among baby boomers is the “Bucket List” travel.  Survey shows that 38% of baby boomers have made a travel bucket list that they wish to tick off one by one within the next several years.  It’s never too late to make your dreams happen.  Every boomer has his/her personal dream destination and experiences, what’s yours?

2. Nutritional Cooking Classes

Good nutrition is important at every stage of our lives, but it becomes even more essential as we age.  A Nutritional Cooking Class will not just cultivate your culinary skills, but will also inspire you to make healthy food choices and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

3. Wine and Painting Events

Wine glass in one hand, paint brush in the other – this is the latest trend that is being enjoyed by many retirees nowadays.  It’s a fun activity to unleash your creativity while socializing at the same time.  FYI, drinking wine in moderation can help combat age-related diseases, doing arts & crafts help prevent dementia and socializing improves the quality of life, emotionally, mentally and physically.

4. Host Families/Students

Hosting an international family or student is a wonderful opportunity to meet new people, build friendships while sharing the American culture.  This is such a rewarding experience knowing that you were able to help a family or student during their stay in your country.

5. Charitable Organizations

Speaking of helping out, your retirement years is also the best time to find charitable organizations to take part in.

6. Teaching

Share your knowledge, skills and expertise with other people.  You can use this as an opportunity to give back to your community or a means to earn some extra cash on the side.

7. Blogging

Find a niche that you are passionate about and start blogging about.  Writing is a good creative outlet that will benefit your cognitive health.  You can make money out of it if you succeed.

8. Home Improvement

Whether you want to downsize or just plan to remodel your home, home improvement projects and DIYs are not just fun but fulfilling as well.

9. Exploring Technology

There’s a lot to explore in technology and it’s never too late to learn about it.  Technology doesn’t just connect you with friends and family members, but it could also make everyday life easier.  Smart home gadgets have been one of the most in demand and fastest growing product category in the tech industry.  Good thing Amazon has a Smart Home Consultation program where you can get all of your smart home questions answered by an expert, as well as product recommendations and installation.

10. Online Dating

Lastly, for single retired baby boomers, why not explore the world of online dating?  The internet now brings you countless opportunities to search for new love within the comforts of your own up, as long as you own smartphone or desktop.

About Toni Marie

Toni is Senior Editor for BabyBoomerTalkBlog, as well as a contributing author. In addition to writing about the Baby Boomer generation, she also likes to write about relationships and health. She is also the primary caregiver for her mother.

This entry was posted in Retirement. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply